The Minimum You Need to Know
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Pages: 795 pp
ISBN: 0-97708660-7
ISBN-13: 978-0-9770866-0-3
Format: Softcover, Perfect binding, 7 in. x 9 in.
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Table of Contents

Introduction

I.1 Purpose of This Book  I-1
I.2 What You Need to Know to Read This Book  I-1
I.3 Who Should Read This Book  I-1
I.4 How to Read This Book  I-2
I.5 Our Sample Application  I-2
I.6 Why OpenVMS?  I-4
I.7 The Definition of Application  I-5

Chapter 1   Fundamentals of OpenVMS

1.1 Hardware  1-1
1.2 Logging In  1-3
1.3 Symbols  1-5
1.4 Editor Choices  1-9
1.5 EDT Exercises  1-14
1.6 TPU  and EVE Configuration  1-18
1.7 LSE  1-20
1.8 Logicals  1-21
1.9 ACLs and the UAF  1-28
1.10 Logical Name Tables  1-38
1.11 Foreign Commands  1-40
1.12 Exercises  1-41

Chapter 2  DCL and Utilities We Need

2.1 DCL for Application Development  2-1
2.2 FDL and Our Indexed Files  2-1
2.3 Indexed File Lore  2-5
2.4 Lexical Functions  2-12
2.5 The Import Program  2-14
2.6 Exercises  2-20

Chapter 3  DEC BASIC

3.1 Goals  3-1
3.2 Language Data Types  3-1
3.3 Magic Numbers  3-3
3.4 Group vs. Record  3-6
3.5 Creating Our Statistics Files  3-7
3.6 Data File Reporting  3-21
3.7 Other BASIC Language Features  3-28
3.8 BASIC Features to Never Use  3-33
3.9 The Zero Element  3-34
3.10 Where Do We Go From Here?   3-35
3.11 Exercises  3-35

Chapter 4  FMS

4.1 What is FMS?  4-1
4.2 Creating a Data Entry Screen in FMS  4-2
4.3 FMS Object vs. Library  4-5
4.4 Stand Alone Data Entry  4-6
4.5 An FMS Browse Program  4-20
4.6  An FMS Menu  4-27
4.7 FMS Functions to Never Use  4-38
4.8 FMS Summary  4-38
4.9 FMS Function and Subroutine Summary  4-39
4.10 Exercises  4-53

Chapter 5  CMS Theory and Practice

5.1 Code Management System  5-1
5.2 Logical Environment for CMS Based Development   5-1
5.3 Creating Our CMS Library  5-9
5.4 Putting Our Application in the Library  5-10
5.5 Deleting an Element From the Library  5-11
5.6 Classes and Deletions  5-12
5.7 Modifying Elements Once They Are in CMS  5-12
5.8 Productionizing the Application  5-13
5.9 Legacy Build Procedure  5-16
5.10 Additional CMS Commands  5-18
5.11 Promotion Between Libraries  5-20
5.12 Exercises  5-29

Chapter 6  CDD

6.1 What is CDD?  6-1
6.2 Some Definitions You Need to Know  6-2
6.3 The Different Camps of CDD Configuration  6-3
6.4 Creating a Repository  6-5
6.5 Defining Our Logicals and Directories  6-6
6.6 Creating Our Fields and Records  6-8
6.7 Converting Our Include File  6-12
6.8 Using Variants and Dates  6-14
6.9 Nuking the CDD  6-20
6.10 Full Build Modification  6-22
6.11 CDD Usage Summary  6-24
6.12 Mass Changes Due to CDD  6-24
6.13 Exercises  6-29

Chapter 7  Object and Text Libraries

7.1 What We Know About Libraries So Far  7-1
7.2 Application Logicals We Need  7-2
7.3 Creating Our Text Library  7-2
7.4 Converting Our Application to a Single EXE  7-3
7.5 Programming Assignment  7-23
7.6 Exercises  7-24

Chapter 8  MMS

8.1 The Purpose of MMS  8-1
8.2 The Correct Way to Use MMS  8-1
8.3 Putting It All Together  8-8
8.4 Exercises  8-12

Chapter 9  Message Utility, Mail and Phone

9.1 Message File Definition  9-1
9.2 VMSMAIL Overview  9-2
9.3 Sending Mail From Inside Server Applications  9-5
9.4 Programming Assignment  9-10
9.5 VMSPhone Overview  9-10
9.6 Creating Your Own Messages  9-12
9.7 Testing Your Messages  9-14
9.8 Programming Assignment 2   9-21
9.9 Exercises  9-21

Chapter 10 FORTRAN

10.1 Yes, It’s Still Out There  10-1
10.2 Basics of Fortran  10-2
10.3 Our Sample Application  10-7
10.4 Programming Assignment 1  10-53
10.5 Using Message Files  10-53
10.6 Our Quadword Example  10-54
10.7 Sending Mail  10-56
10.8 Programming Assignment 2  10-60
10.9 Exercises  10-60

Chapter 11  COBOL

11.1 Overview  11-1
11.2 Interview Questions That Are Red Flags  11-2
11.3 The Myth of the COBOL SORT Verb  11-4
11.4 The DCL SORT Command  11-4
11.5 Our Sample Application  11-6
11.6 Programming Assignment  11-58
11.7 The Rest of the Language  11-59
11.8 Our Quadword Example  11-61
11.9 Sending Mail  11-62
11.10 Programming Assignment 2   11-67
11.11 Exercises  11-68

Chapter 12 C/C++

12.1 Overview  12-1
12.2 Some Differences on OpenVMS  12-6
12.3 Our Sample Application in C  12-9
12.4 C++ Philosophy and Terminology  12-69
12.5 Our Sample Application in C++   12-71
12.6 C/C++ Follow Up  12-139
12.7 Debugging Notes for C/C++   12-146
12.8 Sending Mail  12-147
12.9 D_FLOAT Example  12-152
12.10 Programming Assignments  12-156
12.11 Exercises  12-156

Chapter 13  MySQL

13.1 Why MySQL?  13-1
13.2 Getting and Installing MySQL  13-4
13.3 Our Application Database  13-9
13.4 Creating the Tables  13-10
13.5 Compiling and Linking With MySQL  13-13
13.6 Our Sample Application  13-17
13.7 MySQL Follow-up  13-65
13.8 Programming Assignments  13-67
13.9 Exercises  13-69

Chapter 14  RDB

14.1 Why RDB?  14-1
14.2 What’s in the Book and What’s on Disk  14-4
14.3 Table and Database Definitions  14-5
14.4 The Drawbacks  14-14
14.5 Our SQLMOD Implementation  14-15
14.6 Programming Assignment 1   14-29
14.7 SQLMOD Follow Up  14-37
14.8 EXEC SQL Implementation  14-38
14.9 RDB Follow Up  14-54
14.10 Programming Assignment 2   14-55
14.11 Exercises  14-55

Chapter 15  Ruminations and Observations

15.1 Overview  15-1
15.2 What Do You Do?  15-1
15.3 Keep Your Eye on the Sparrow  15-5
15.4 Have You Ever Wondered Why Y2K Happened?  15-6
15.5 Optimal Technology  15-9
15.6 The Self-Defeating Business Model  15-11
15.7 Offshore Computing – The Death Knell of IT in the U.S.  15-14
15.8 Avoiding a Hell-Hole  15-17



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